Resources and Links

Below are links to various garden resources, organizations and other sites of interest.

Garden Guild of Winnetka Book Group, Suggested Reading List

Omnivore's Dilemma, Michael Pollen

The Upside Down:Catastrophe, Creativity and the Renewal of Civilization, Thomas Homer Dixon

The Living Great Lakes, Jerry Dennis

Water Wars, Diane Ward

Radical Pruning, Bonnie Thomas Abbott

The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollen

Water, The Epic Struggle for Wealth, Power and Civilization, Steven Solomon

Dirt, The Erosion of Civilizations, David R. Montgomery

A Sand County Almanac, Aldo Leopold

The End of Nature,  Bill McKibben

Red Sky at Morning, James Gustave Speth

The Coming Storm, Bob Reiss

Our Stolen Future, Theo Colborn

Now or Never, Tim Flannery

https://www.gcamerica.org/publications

General Book Suggestions

Floret Farm's Cut Flower Garden: Grow, Harvest & Arrange Stunning Seasonal Blooms
https://www.floretflowers.com/book/
By Erin Benzakein (Author), Julie Chai (Author), Michele M. Waite (Photographer)

 

The Flower Farmer: An Organic Grower's Guide to Raising and Selling Cut Flowers, 2nd Edition
By Lynn Byczynski (Author), Robin Wimbiscus (Illustrator)
https://www.growingformarket.com/store/products/6

 

The Food Explorer: The True Adventures of the Globe-Trotting Botanist Who Transformed What America Eats 

Famed botanical explorer David Fairchild, who traveled the world at the turn of the 20th century and introduced to the U.S. many of our most common food crops—avocados, mangoes, dates, kale, and hundreds of others. https://www.danielstonebooks.com/

 

Green Thunb Publications  www.greenthumbpublications.com    Digital books and photos about gardeningD

Clean Energy Common Sense: An American Call to Action on Global Climate Change by Frances Beinecke and Bob Deans - highly recommended - clear, concise facts, fast read  great for skeptics, would be a good choice for discussion in a Conservation Committee meeting

Bringing Nature Home by Douglas Tallamy - somewhat academic in parts, but WONDERFUL message and information about the importance of using native plants

Bird-by-Bird Gardening by Sally Roth - more for personal reference than a book club, but great info about specifically what to plant to attract certain birds

Native Alternatives to Invasive Plants - Brooklyn Botanic Garden All-Region Guides - gives specific alternatives to invasives. I didn't know butterfly bush is considered an invasive, and that preferable alternatives are Cephalanthus occidentalis (Buttonbush) or Clethra alnifolia (Summersweet).

Earth: The Sequel by Fred Krupp

Founding Gardeners: How the Revolutionary Generation Created an American Eden by Andrea Wulf - www.andreawulf.com

Wicked Plants: A Book of Botanical Atrocities by Amy Stewart

Flower Confidential: The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful in the Business of Flowers by Amy Stewart

The Earth Moved: On the Remarkable Achievements of Earthworms by Amy Stewart

From the Ground Up: The Story of a First Garden by Amy Stewart - www.amystewart.com

The Kitchen Gardener's Handbook by Jennifer R. Bartley

Designing the New Kitchen Garden: An American Potager Handbook by Jennifer R. Bartley

A Time to Plant, Luxurious Garden Living by James T. Farmer, III - www.jamesfarmer.com

The Native Landscape Reader edited by Robert E. Grese

Growing Up with the River by Dan & Connie Burkhardt

Everglades America's Wetland by Mac Stone

American Eden: By David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic 

The Garden Club of Barrington

Keepers of the Land

The Garden Club of St. Louis Book Group, Suggested Reading List

Weeds: In Defense of Nature's Most Unloved Plants, Richard Mabey.
Richard Mabey, Great Britain’s “greatest living nature writer” (London Times), has written a stirring and passionate defense of nature’s most unloved plants.  Weeds is a fascinating, eye-opening, and vastly entertaining appreciation of the natural world’s unappreciated wildflowers that will appeal to fans of David Attenborough, Robert Sullivan’s Rats, Amy Stewart’s Wicked Plants, and to armchair gardeners, horticulturists, green-thumbs, all those who stop to smell the flowers.

The Garden in Winter, Suzy Bales

Gardens in the Spirit of Place, Page Dickey

Second Nature, Michael Pollan

Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan

The Orchid Thief, Susan Orlean

The Gardens of Brécy, A Lasting Landscape, Eric T. Haskell

Stickwork, Patrick Dougherty
With anecdotes and insights into his methods and his art.

down-to-earth Gardener, Suzy Bales

Garden Bouquets & Beyond, Suzy Bales

The American Meadow Garden: Creating a Natural Alternative to the Traditional Lawn, John Greenlee

Henry Shaw's Victorian Landscapes: The Missouri Botanical Garden and Tower Grove Park, Carol Grove (professor at U of M)foreward by Peter Raven, afterword by John Karel

A Genuis for Place: American Landscapes of the Country Place Era, Robin Karson

Mission 66: Modernism and the National Park Dilemna, Ethan Carr

The Muses of Gwinn: Art and Nature in a Garden Designed by Warren Manning, Charles Platt, and Ellen Biddle Shipman, Robin Karson  (American Society of Landscape Architects Honor Award)

Midwestern Landscape Architecture, edited by William  H. Tischler

Weeds: In Defense of Nature's Most Unloved Plants, Richard Mabey.
Richard Mabey, Great Britain’s “greatest living nature writer” (London Times), has written a stirring and passionate defense of nature’s most unloved plants.  Weeds is a fascinating, eye-opening, and vastly entertaining appreciation of the natural world’s unappreciated wildflowers that will appeal to fans of David Attenborough, Robert Sullivan’s Rats, Amy Stewart’s Wicked Plants, and to armchair gardeners, horticulturists, green-thumbs, all those who stop to smell the flowers.

The Art of Elegance: Classic Interiors; Marshall Watson

Known for his meticulously researched, European inspired style, Marshall Watson creates interiors that are rich in texture, detail, and simple luxuries. In his first book, Watson shares his finest work, demonstrating that while each of these homes is as unique as its owner, they all adhere to principlesthat transform a mere series of spaces into a genuine, coherent home: warmth; light; peace; comfort; balance; proportion; livability; and last but not least appropriateness. Whether in an Italianate villa in Los Cabos or a family idyll on a Swedish island, a Gramercy Park apartment that blends shimmer and restraint or a Newport Beach cottage warmed by walls finished in egg-yolk yellow, Watson explains how he translated each family’s lifestyle and aspirations, the house’s history, and the surrounding environment into a highly original form of elegance--and how anyone can discover his or her own. Beautifully photographed with lavish images of Watson’s work, this inspiring book is a must-have for interior design lovers.